DNA from Cincinnati Zoo’s “Ipuh” Provides Evidence that Trouble for Sumatran Rhinos Began 1 Million Years Ago

In addition to being responsible for the existence of about 10% of the world’s remaining Sumatran rhinos, Cincinnati Zoo’s beloved Ipuh has now helped scientists trace the start of his species’ population decline and provided basic biological information that may improve the health and well being of future generations.

Photos:  Ipuh at the Cincinnati Zoo |  Ipuh at Cincinnati Museum Center | 2017 Sumatra Visit

An international team of researchers…

Ultrasound Confirms Hippo Pregnancy!

Cincinnati Zoo team captures worlds first image of a Nile hippo in the womb 

CINCINNATI, OH  (January 9, 2017) – The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden is kicking off 2017 with some big news!  Zoo scientists and animal staff captured the first ever ultrasound image of a Nile hippo fetus last week, confirming that 17-year-old Bibi is pregnant.

Keepers, and almost everyone…

Brazilian Ocelot Births Validate Importance of Artificial Insemination for Species Conservation

CINCINNATI (March 28, 2016)– Since 2010, three Brazilian ocelot kittens, females “Milagre,” “Ayla,” and “Revy,” have been produced using artificial insemination (AI) techniques developed and performed by scientists from the Cincinnati Zoo’s Center for Conservation & Research of Endangered Wildlife (CREW). All three of these genetically-valuable ocelots have gone on to produce offspring of their own as a result of natural breeding. The most recent kitten was born at the Santa Ana Zoo in December to Revy, the last…

Cincinnati Zoo’s Pollen Nation Buzzing with Activity

Zoo takes local action to give bees a chance

honeybeesatomCINCINNATI (May 25, 2015) – The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden is embracing bees. Honeybees, or Apis mellifera, to be specific. Honeybees do more than just pollinate flowers and make honey. They also pollinate a third of the world’s crops and are critical to our agricultural…

Glass, Glass Baby: Breakthrough in cryopreservation technique produces kittens at Cincinnati Zoo’s Center for Conservation & Research of Endangered Wildlife (CREW)!

CINCINNATI  (May 11, 2015) – Cincinnati Zoo’s Center for Conservation & Research of Endangered Wildlife (CREW), a world leader in small cat reproductive research, has successfully produced the first non-human offspring – of any species – using vitrified sperm (semen preserved as glass instead of ice) for artificial insemination (AI).  The only other reported birth from AI using vitrified sperm was a single human baby produced at a fertility clinic in Chile in 2011.Glass...
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