Domino Roach

Domino roach web

The white-spotted pattern of the domino roach is thought to be a form of defensive mimicry.  Would be predators  may mistake the roach for a six-spotted ground beetle, which sprays an irritating chemical when threatened.  The domino roach also secretes its own defensive chemical that serves to alarm other roaches of a impending danger.

Green Leaf Katydid

katydid web

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“You are what you eat” seems to fit this insect since it looks like a leaf.  It is similar to a grasshopper (yes, it jumps) but is nocturnal and uses its long antennae to feel about in the dark.  The male makes ‘chit-chit’ sounds at night by rubbing his wings together to attract a receptive female.

American Burying Beetle

american burying beetle

The American burying beetle makes a living out of eating the dead. A male and female find and bury a small dead animal, perhaps a rodent carcass. Reproduction occurs during summer months and eggs laid nearby soon hatch into grubs (larvae) which feed on the carrion for about a week. Both the male and female help care for the larvae. Next the larvae pupate and emerge as young adults a couple months later. 

Blue Death Feigning Beetle

blue death feigning beetle web

When threatened, the blue death feigning beetle rolls over on its back and plays dead. Predators, such as spiders, prefer live prey. The blue coloring comes from the wax secreted by the desert-dwelling beetle to create a protective shield against dehydration and overheating.


Magnificent Flower Beetle

magnificant flower beetle

A colorful scarab, the magnificent flower beetle visits flowers to eat nectar and pollen. It also feeds on ripe or rotting fruit.  Males are larger than females and bear forked horns used in shoving matches with other males to protect their claim to food or a mate.

Honeybee

honeybee web

Honeybees are highly social, cooperative insects. Led by a single queen, worker bees—which are all female—forage for food, build and protect the hive, and care for the young. The male honeybee, the drone, exists for the sole purpose of mating and passing on the colony genes.

Zebra Bug

zebra-bug-milan-bushing

This handsomely marked insect is actually a species of cockroach. Its colorful pattern warns potential predators, such as birds and small mammals, that it can quickly release a noxious, eye and noseburning chemical deterrent. In other words, “Do not try to eat me or you’ll regret it!”

Yellow-bellied Beetle

yellow bellied beetle

This brightly patterned beetle really does have a yellow underside. It is a strong flyer, widespread and commonly observed in nature, much like our native June beetle in the United States. Eggs are laid in the ground and the grubs, or larvae, burrow and feed in compost and dung, then pupate within small earthen cocoons.

White-eyed Assassin Bug

white-eyed assasin bug

Assassin bugs have piercing-sucking mouthparts used to impale prey or enemies and inject venom. The white eye-like spots on this insect’s wings serve to warn enemies of its painful bite. Like all true bugs, it has gradual metamorphosis involving three life stages: eggs, nymphs and adults.

Water Strider

water strider

This aquatic bug is sometimes also called a water skipper or pond skater for an obvious reason—it spends most of its life on the water surface! Its long mid and hind legs spread body weight over a large area and are coated with tiny air-trapping hairs providing pontoon-like floatation.