Rhinoceros Katydid

Belonging to a group known as the conehead katydids, the rhinoceros katydid sports a horn-like projection atop its head. The horn is used to ward off attacks from hungry bats. While most katydids are herbivores, the rhinoceros katydid feeds on animals as well as plants with the help of a large, mighty jaw.

Water Scorpion

Using a long tube, or siphon, as a snorkel to access air, the water scorpion sits on the bottom of a pond and waits for prey to come by. It grabs prey with its forelegs. Through a straw-like mouthpart, the water scorpion injects the prey with saliva to liquefy it. Then it sucks up dinner.

Passion Flower Butterfly

The passion flower butterfly depends on an intimate relationship with the passion flower vine. As a caterpillar, it feasts on the young leaves and builds up immunity to the plant’s toxins. As an adult, it drinks the flower’s nectar and pollen.

Domino Roach

The white-spotted pattern of the domino roach is thought to be a form of defensive mimicry.  Would be predators  may mistake the roach for a six-spotted ground beetle, which sprays an irritating chemical when threatened.  The domino roach also secretes its own defensive chemical that serves to alarm other roaches of a impending danger.

Green Leaf Katydid

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“You are what you eat” seems to fit this insect since it looks like a leaf.  It is similar to a grasshopper (yes, it jumps) but is nocturnal and uses its long antennae to feel about in the dark.  The male makes ‘chit-chit’ sounds at night by rubbing his wings together to attract a receptive female.

American Burying Beetle

The American burying beetle makes a living out of eating the dead. A male and female find and bury a small dead animal, perhaps a rodent carcass. Reproduction occurs during summer months and eggs laid nearby soon hatch into grubs (larvae) which feed on the carrion for about a week. Both the male and female help care for the larvae. Next the larvae pupate and emerge as young adults a couple months later. 

Blue Death Feigning Beetle

When threatened, the blue death feigning beetle rolls over on its back and plays dead. Predators, such as spiders, prefer live prey. The blue coloring comes from the wax secreted by the desert-dwelling beetle to create a protective shield against dehydration and overheating.


Magnificent Flower Beetle

A colorful scarab, the magnificent flower beetle visits flowers to eat nectar and pollen. It also feeds on ripe or rotting fruit.  Males are larger than females and bear forked horns used in shoving matches with other males to protect their claim to food or a mate.

Honeybee

Honeybees are highly social, cooperative insects. Led by a single queen, worker bees—which are all female—forage for food, build and protect the hive, and care for the young. The male honeybee, the drone, exists for the sole purpose of mating and passing on the colony genes.

Zebra Bug

This handsomely marked insect is actually a species of cockroach. Its colorful pattern warns potential predators, such as birds and small mammals, that it can quickly release a noxious, eye and noseburning chemical deterrent. In other words, “Do not try to eat me or you’ll regret it!”