Sugar Glider

Sugar Glider (2) web

Sugar gliders are small possums that can glide more than 100 feet between trees thanks to a thin, furred membrane, known as a patagium, which stretches from the wrist to the ankle on both sides. Hand-like forefeet and hind feet with an opposable toe similar to a human thumb help them grasp branches.

Feather-tailed Glider

Feather-tailed Glider (18) web

Stretching out its patagium, a thin, furred membrane that extends from wrist to knee, the feather-tailed glider glides up to 65 feet from tree to tree like a parachute. Its tail resembles a feather with stiff hairs on either side, which helps the glider steer. Sharp claws dig into the tree’s bark upon landing.

Parma Wallaby

parma wallaby

Kangaroos and wallabies are in the same family, with wallabies as the smaller of the two. When a baby wallaby, called a joey, is born it climbs into a pouch on its mother’s belly where it stays safe and hidden for the first six or seven months of its life.

Bennett’s Wallaby

bennetts wallaby

Kangaroos and wallabies are in the same family, with wallabies as the smaller of the two. Bennett’s wallaby, also called the red-necked wallaby, is generally solitary, though loose mobs may come together while foraging at night. During the day, the wallaby rests among dense patches of shrubs within the forest.