Barbour’s map turtle

barbours map turtle web

The Barbour’s map turtle lives in clear flowing rivers found in Florida, Georgia and Alabama. Often spotted basking in the sun on top of rocks and snags, the turtle will dive into the water when threatened. In this turtle species, females grow to more than double the size of males.

Thai Red Mountain Rat Snake

RedMountainRatSnake

The Thai red mountain rat snake spends most of its time burrowed beneath logs, rocks, and plants. In early evening and early morning, it comes out of hiding to hunt for small animals. To survive the cooler winter months, mountain rat snakes go into a hibernation-like state called brumation.

Blue Spiny Lizard

Blue Spiny Lizard (12) web

Closely related to the iguana, the blue spiny lizard sports sharp, pointy scales for defense. It also relies on camouflage to keep from being seen. When it’s time to win a mate, however, males will show off their blue throats and underbellies.

Black Milk Snake

blackmilksnake web

A type of king snake, the non-venomous milk snake is known to prey on other snakes, including venomous species. In actuality, it eats pretty much anything it can catch. It does not, however, drink cow’s milk, as people once believed since they often spotted the snakes in barns.

African Fat-Tailed Gecko

African Fat-tailed Gecko

During the dry, summer season, the African fat-tailed gecko estivates, or remains inactive, within a burrow. It can survive lean times off the fat stored in its tail. During active seasons, the gecko emerges from its burrow at night to hunt for insects.

Puff Adder

puff adder web

The most common and widespread venomous snake in Africa, the puff adder is responsible for the majority of snake bites on the continent. Sitting motionless and camouflaged on the ground, the puff adder is often not seen until stepped on. Inch-long fangs deliver enough venom to kill a man with a single bite.

Ornate Monitor

ornate monitor

The ornate monitor pretty much eats whatever it can catch, or in the case of carrion, whatever it can sniff out. Sometimes two monitors will team up to make a meal. One distracts a mother crocodile or bird from its nest, while the other robs the nest of its eggs.

Boa Constrictor

boa constrictor guilherme jofili

Thanks to the coloration and pattern of its body, the boa constrictor is barely distinguishable from the forest floor.  Here it sits and waits for the opportunity to ambush unsuspecting prey. Striking and seizing prey in its jaws, the boa then quickly wraps its body around its prey to suffocate it and then swallows it whole.

Rainbow Boa

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Though it will climb trees to escape danger, the rainbow boa spends most of its time on the ground.  Slinking about at night, its heat-sensing pits enable it to locate warm-blooded prey through temperature differentiation.  The boa subdues its prey through suffocation, constricting it with its body, and then swallows it whole.

California King Snake

California king snake

King snakes are considered the king of snakes for their habit of eating other snakes, including rattlesnakes.  Rattlesnake venom has little effect on them.  The California king snake is primarily active during the day, yet will switch to night hunting as temperatures rise.