Cape Porcupine


When threatened, the Cape porcupine erects its spines and quills to look bigger. Contrary to popular belief, a porcupine cannot shoot its spines and quills. However, the spines and quills can embed in an intruder’s flesh if they come into contact. The porcupine grows new spines and quills to replace those that are lost.


2015-05-13 Zoo Gladys Mona Bonobos Capabaras 1 584

The capybara lives in a social group of 10 or more led by a dominant male. Males mark their territory by rubbing a scent gland on top of its snout, called the morillo, onto vegetation. With slightly webbed toes, the capybara is an excellent swimmer and often rushes into the water to escape predators.


Chinchilla - 01 web

Chinchillas are small, soft rodents with bushy tails, large ears and long whiskers. With more hairs per follicle than any other mammal, chinchillas have a super soft coat that keeps them warm in the Andes mountains. Their red blood cells are able to carry more oxygen than other rodents, which is another adaptation to living in high altitudes.

Naked Mole-rat

naked mole rat

Living in large colonies, the nearly blind naked mole-rat spends its entire life excavating tunnels underground in search of roots and tubers.  The colony is led by a single breeding female called the queen that mates with several males. All other colony  members forgo breeding to raise the pups, forage, and maintain the burrow.