2016 Lectures

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Thane Maynard talks with the four 2015 Barrows Conservation Lecture Series speakers on a special segment of Cincinnati Edition. Listen now!  

About the Series

Jane Goodall – First Recipient of the Cincinnati Zoo’s WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AWARD

Since 1993, the series has brought a slate of esteemed naturalists and scientists to Cincinnati to address wildlife issues and global conservation efforts.

The Barrows Conservation Lecture Series is made possible by the ongoing support of the family of Winifred & Emil Barrows.

Cincinnati Zoo Wildlife Conservation Award Recipients (pdf).


Tickets

Tickets are on sale now for the annual Barrows Conservation Lecture Series. Order your before they sell out!

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Wednesday, May 4 at 7pm – Dr. Joy Reidenberg, Ph.D., Professor

Wednesday, May 11 at 7pm – Scott Weidensaul, Ornithologist and author

Joy S. Reidenberg2Wednesday,May 4

Why Whales are Weird, Wacky, and Wonderful – Dr. Joy Reidenberg

Who doesn’t like whales?  They’re awesome!  This talk will dive into the wild world of their weird anatomy, wacky evolutionary story, and wonderful adaptations.  Through the science of comparative anatomy, you will learn about what makes whales (including dolphins and porpoises) unique.  We’ll explore why their body differs from other animals, how it functions underwater, and what we can learn from this to benefit human medicine and technology.

Scott WeidensaulWednesday, May 11 

Messing Around with Birds (For Fun and Science) – Scott Weidensaul, Ornithologist and author

Join naturalist Scott Weidensaul for a lighthearted exploration of his many avian research projects, from banding hawks and tiny saw-whet owls to studying the migration of western hummingbirds that aren’t supposed to be in the East in December (but are), and snowy owls down from the Arctic. Best of all, learn how anyone with some enthusiasm and time can make important contributions to the science and conservation of birds, and have a great time doing it.

Scott Weidensaul is the author of more than two dozen books on natural history, including the Pulitzer Prize finalist “Living on the Wind,” about bird migration, “Return to Wild America,” and “The First Frontier: The Forgotten History of Struggle, Savagery and Endurance in Early America.” His newest book, “The Peterson Reference Guide to Owls of North America and the Caribbean,” has just been published.  Weidensaul is a contributing editor for Audubon and writes for a variety of other publications; he lives in the mountains of eastern Pennsylvania, where he studies the migration of hawks, owls and hummingbirds.

Peterson Reference Guide to Owls of North America and the Caribbean; Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2015
The First Frontier: The Forgetten History of Struggle, Savagery and Endurance in Early America; Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2012.
Of a Feather: A Brief History of American Birding; Harcourt, 2007.
Return to Wild America: A Yearlong Search for the Continent’s Natural Soul; North Point Press, 2005.
The Ghost with Trembling Wings: Science, Wishful Thinking and the Search for Lost Species; North Point Press, 2002.
Living on the Wind: Across the Hemisphere with Migratory Birds; North Point Press (Farrar, Straus & Giroux), 1999.